Governor Haslam Raising Concerns About Voter ID Law - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Governor Haslam Raising Concerns About Voter ID Law

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Governor Haslam has made headlines this weekend after raising issues about a controversial bill he signed into law several months ago. Governor Haslam has made headlines this weekend after raising issues about a controversial bill he signed into law several months ago.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Governor Haslam has made headlines this weekend after raising issues about a controversial bill he signed into law several months ago.

It revolves around the Voter ID bill which calls for every Tennessean to have a photo ID so they can vote. Just days before it goes into effect, Haslam is concerned the law will make it "unnecessarily hard" for some people.

He told the Knoxville-News Sentinel he is not recommending changes in the new law.

"We haven't made that recommendation to them yet. I think the way government works, you know, is that our job is to carry out things, and also to propose things. At this point in time, all we've done is raise the issue," he said.

Sources said the governor has actually done more than that, pushing Republican leadership to exempt seniors from the new law, and voicing concerns the Department of Motor Vehicles won't be able to handle the workload, when more people go to get those photo IDs.

Haslam has met with Republican lawmakers over the past few weeks. Repeatedly they have told him they will not change the bill to exempt seniors.

Senator Bill Ketron told NewsChannel 5, "We feel like one fraudulent vote disenfranchises the one person who tries to go and vote legally."

Senator Ketron was in those meetings with the governor and won't agree to any changes because he believes the new law protects the voting process.

Turns out, an opponent against the bill agrees with the senator.

Mary Mancini with Tennessee Citizen Actions sent this statement to NewsChannel 5, "Any exemption to the law, like the law itself, creates barriers for some and not for others thereby rendering the election process inherently unfair."

Republicans also say the legislation passed in May was modeled after a similar law that was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court.

That still hasn't stopped groups like the ACLU and their plans to sue the state in the new year.  Even with the governor's involvement and two bills that have already been filed to overturn the new voting law, many wonder what are the chances anything will really change.

Sources said Republicans plan to stand their ground and with their majority, successfully fight off any attempts to change anything.

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